Events

Our forthcoming events are listed below. We would love to see you here, but seating is very limited so please book early to avoid disappointment.
To book, please visit our online shop

You can also call or email the bookshop on 020 7229 1010, bookshop@lutyensrubinstein.co.uk to reserve your tickets.

Join our mailing list to be the first to hear about new events.

FORTHCOMING EVENTS

Saturday 24th June, from 10.30am
Independent Bookshop Week – Bookshop Party
10.30am – EMMA CHICHESTER CLARK & PLUMDOG STORYTIME
1.00pm – ALLIE ESIRI LUNCHTIME POETRY
3.30pm – MARK BILLINGHAM & SEBASTIAN FAULKS GUEST BOOKSELLERS

Wednesday 28th June, 7pm (£10)
BELLA POLLEN and JULIA SAMUEL in Conversation
More Information and Booking

FORTHCOMING BOOK CLUBS

Saturdays at 10.30am – STORYTIME
Half an hour of reading for the under-five set, just turn up!

Wednesday 28th June, 12.30pm – LUNCHTIME CLASSICS BOOK CLUB: THE SHOOTING PARTY
To join this book club, please email claire@lutyensrubinstein.co.uk

Thursday 29th June, 1pm – CRIME CLUB: STRANGERS ON A TRAIN
To join this book club, please email claire@lutyensrubinstein.co.uk

Friday 30th June 2017, 11.15am – DAYLIGHT BOOK CLUB: AMONGST WOMEN
To join this book club, please email claire@lutyensrubinstein.co.uk

Thursday 6th July, 11am – NON FICTION BOOK CLUB: FOOTSTEPS: LITERARY PILGRIMAGES AROUND THE WORLD
To join this book club, please email claire@lutyensrubinstein.co.uk

Monday 17th July 2017, 12.30pm – CHILDREN’S LITERATURE FOR GROWN-UPS: ANNE OF GREEN GABLES
To join this book club, please email tara@lutyensrubinstein.co.uk

PREVIOUS EVENTS

Wednesday 21st June)
ADAM PHILLIPS on IN WRITING

Tuesday 16th May
JENNY LANDRETH on SWELL

Tuesday 25th April 2017
JOANNA MOORHEAD on THE SURREAL LIFE OF LEONORA CARRINGTON

Thursday 6th April 2017
JEAN HANFF KORELITZ and PAUL MULDOON

Tuesday 21st February 2017
AMOR TOWLES discussed A GENTLEMAN IN MOSCOW

Saturday 26th November 2016
POPPY CHANCELLOR: Cut it Out, a Christmas Papercutting workshop

Tuesday 22nd November 2016
ARTEMIS COOPER discussed ELIZABETH JANE HOWARD with SELINA HASTINGS

Tuesday 25th October 2016
RORY STEWART discussed The Marches

Tuesday 4th October 2016
BEN MACINTYRE discussed SAS: Rogue Heroes

Tuesday 20th September
TED SANDLING discussed London In Fragments

Tuesday 28th June
HISHAM MATAR discussed The Return with WILLIAM FIENNES

Tuesday 21st June
ANITA BROOKNER: A panel discussion
Chaired by Juliet Annan, with Carmen Callil, Rachel Cooke and Tessa Hadley

Thursday 9th June 2016
EMMA CLINE discussed The Girls with Alexandra Heminsley

Tuesday 24th May 2016
PHILIPPE SANDS discussed East West Street with KATE FIGES

Tuesday 17th May 2016
JOHN PRESTON discussed A Very English Scandal with ROLAND PHILLIPS

Tuesday 19th April 2016
LISA OWENS & ANNA RAVERAT in Conversation with FRANCESCA MAIN

Tuesday 16th February 2016
ELIZABETH STROUT discussed My Name is Lucy Barton with CRESSIDA CONNOLLY

Tuesday 8th December 2015
ADAM PHILLIPS discussed Unforbidden Pleasures

Wednesday 28th October 2015
GARTH RISK HALLBERG discussed City on Fire with Tom Sutcliffe

Wednesday 30th September2015
Grief… and Happiness: MAX PORTER and JACK UNDERWOOD were in Conversation

Tuesday 29th September 2015
SEBASTIAN FAULKS discussed Where My Heart Used to Beat

Wednesday 9th September 2015
An Evening of Debut Novelists with: COLIN MACINTYRE, LAURA BARNETT, ANTONIA HONEYWELL & CATRIONA WARD

Wednesday 2nd September 2015
BILL CLEGG was in Conversation with ROLAND PHILIPPS

Tuesday 1st September 2015
ELENA FERRANTE: A PANEL DISCUSSION
With CATHY RENTZENBRINK, JONATHAN GIBBS, SUSANNA GROSS and TESSA HADLEY

Thursday 13th August 2015
DAVID GATES and STUART EVERS were in Conversation

Tuesday 14th July 2015
HARPER LEE: A PANEL DISCUSSION
with HADLEY FREEMAN, PHILIPPE SANDS, LOUISA YOUNG & ISABEL ADOMAKOH YOUNG

Tuesday 23rd June 2015
WOMEN IN CLOTHES
Conversation & Clothes Swap with LEANNE SHAPTON

Tuesday 16th June 2015
JAMES WOOD discussed The Nearest Thing to Life

Tuesday 2nd June 2015
HADLEY FREEMAN discussed Life Moves Pretty Fast: The Lessons We Learned from Eighties Movies.

Wednesday 27th May 2015
GERBRAND BAKKER & PER PETTERSON were in Conversation

Tuesday 19th May 2015
Doctors Dissected
MARTIN SCURR & JANE HAYNES were in Conversation

Tuesday 12th May 2015
Germany & Britain
GILES WATERFIELD and NEIL MACGREGOR were in Conversation with GINA THOMAS

Tuesday 5th May 2015
On The Wilder Shores of Love
GEORGIA DE CHAMBERET discussed the life and works of Lesley Blanch with ELISA SEGRAVE

Wednesday 29th April 2015
Love, Sex & Other Foreign Policy Goals
JESSE ARMSTRONG in Conversation with NED BEAUMAN

Tuesday 21st April 2015
Who Governs Britain & Get it Together
ANTHONY KING and ZOE WILLIAMS in Conversation

Tuesday, 3rd March 2015
ALEXANDRA FULLER discussed Leaving Before the Rains Come

Thursday 26th February 2015
DANA THOMAS discussed Gods & Kings: The Rise and Fall of Alexander McQueen and John Galliano

Tuesday 25th November 2014
WILL SELF and IAIN SINCLAIR discussed JG Ballard

Tuesday 28th October 2014
EMMANUEL CARRERE discussed Limonov with ROBERT MCCRUM

Wednesday 15th October 2014
TIMOTHY DONNELLY was in conversation with ADAM PHILLIPS

Tuesday 1st July
ADAM PHILLIPS on Becoming Freud

Thursday 29th May 2014
JOANNA RAKOFF discussed My Salinger Year with RACHEL COOKE

Wednesday 28th May 2014
KATHRYN SIMMONDS in conversation with ADAM PHILLIPS

Wednesday 21st May 2014
KARL OVE KNAUSGAARD in conversation with STEPHEN GROSZ

Tuesday 13th May 2014
PATRICK NESS discussed More than This with VIV GROSKOP

Tuesday 6th May 2014
NED BEAUMAN and ZOE PILGER were in CONVERSATION

Thursday 24th April 2014
ALICE GREENWAY and REBECCA HUNT were in conversation

Tuesday 25th March 2014, 7pm (£8)
BEN MACINTYRE on A Spy Among Friends: Kim Philby and the Great Betrayal

Tuesday 18th March 2014
REBECCA MEAD was in conversation with FERNANDA EBERSTADT on The Road to Middlemarch

Tuesday 4th March 2014
BEN WATT was in conversation with JOHN NIVEN

Thursday 6th February 2014
JAMES LASDUN was in conversation with ADAM PHILLIPS

Monday 2nd December 2013
Nina Stibbe was in conversation with Nick Hornby

Wednesday 27th November 2013
Adam Phillips was in Conversation with Lisa Appignanesi

Wednesday 30th October 2013
Emily Berry was in conversation with Adam Phillips

Thursday 5th September 2013
THE RUM READINGS

Wednesday 28th August 2013, 7pm
SUNDAY NIGHT MOVIES
Leanne Shapton in conversation with Craig Taylor

Thursday 15th August 2013
The Interestings and Clever Girl
Meg Wolitzer and Tessa Hadley in conversation.

Tuesday 16th July 2013
Philipp Meyer discussed The Son with Chris Cleave

Thursday 11th July 2013
Holland House
A Talk by Linda Kelly

Tuesday 2nd July 2013
The Woman Upstairs
Claire Messud talked to Kate Figes

Monday 1st July 2013
Ruth Ozeki and Matt Haig were in conversation with Jamie Byng

Thursday, 6th June 2013
Curtis Sittenfeld Discussed Sisterland with Viv Groskop

Wednesday 1st May 2013
Ron Rash discussed Nothing Gold Can Stay

Tuesday April 30th 2013
William Sutcliffe and John McCarthy were in conversation with William Sieghart

Wednesday 27th March 2013
Oli Hazzard was in conversation with Adam Phillips

Wednesday 13th February 2013
Stephen Grosz and Andrew Solomon were in conversation with Cressida Connolly

Wednesday, 6th February 2013
Lucy Hughes-Hallett discussed The Pike

Monday, 21st January 2013
Don Paterson was in conversation with Adam Phillips

Wednesday, November 28th 2012
Connie Bensley was in conversation with Adam Phillips

Wednesday, September 12th 2012
Jane Draycott was in conversation with Adam Phillips

Monday, September 10th 2012
Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi discussed Jerusalem with Giles Fraser

Wednesday, August 1st 2012
Leanne Shapton discussed Swimming Studies with Craig Taylor

Tuesday, July 3rd 2012
Ned Beauman and Nick Harkaway discussed The Teleportation Accident and Angelmaker with Roland Philipps

Thursday, 21st June 2012
Kate Summerscale discussed Mrs Robinson’s Disgrace with India Knight

Tuesday, 12th June 2012
Adam Phillips discussed Missing Out with Giles Fraser

Monday, 28th May 2012
Chad Harbach on The Art of Fielding

Monday, 23rd April 2012
Ben Macintyre discussed Double Cross

Thursday, 19th April 2012
Peter Stamm discussed Seven Years with Adam Thirlwell

Wednesday, 21st March 2012
Philip Gross was in conversation with Adam Phillips

Wednesday, 14th March 2012
Sadakat Kadri was in conversation with Barnaby Rogerson

Wednesday, 22nd February 2012
John Fuller was in conversation with Adam Phillips

Thursday, 9th February 2012
Lavinia Greenlaw was in conversation with Ted Hodgkinson of Granta Magazine

Tuesday, 31st January 2012
Laura Del-Rivo and Michael Horovitz were in Conversation with Julian Mash

Tuesday, 22nd November 2011
Cressida Connolly and Vendela Vida were in Conversation

Thursday, 17th November 2011
Adam O’ Riordan was in Conversation with Adam Phillips

Wednesday, 28th September 2011
Bernard O’Donoghue was in Conversation with Adam Phillips

Thursday, 23rd June 2011
Hisham Matar was in Conversation with Philippe Sands

Tuesday, 31st May 2011
Evelyn Juers discussed The House of Exile

Wednesday, 25th May 2011
John Burnside was in conversation with Adam Phillips

Monday, 23rd May 2011
Nicola Shulman discussed Graven With Diamonds with Alan Jenkins

Thursday, 19th May 2011
Wilson Stephens Jones Decorative Arts Sale

Wednesday, 11th May 2011
David Miller and David Flusfeder discussed Today and A Film By Spencer Ludwig

Wednesday, 20th April 2011
Christopher Reid was in conversation with Adam Phillips

Sunday, 10th April 2011
James Frey discussed The Final Testament of the Holy Bible with Kate Muir

Sunday, 23rd March 2011
Jennifer Egan discussed A Visit From the Goon Squad

Thursday, 17th March 2011
Jesse Norman discussed The Big Society with Anthony Fry

Wednesday, 16th March 2011
Jo Shapcott was in conversation with Adam Phillips

Wednesday, 26th January 2011
Emma Forrest discussed Your Voice in My Head with Jon Ronson

Wednesday, 24th November 2010
Geoff Dyer discussed Working The Room

Wednesday, 17th November 2010
Adam Phillips discussed On Balance

Wednesday, 3rd November 2010
Justine Picardie discussed Coco Chanel: A Life

Wednesday, 15th September 2010
Rebecca Hunt and Ned Beauman discussed Mr Chartwell and Boxer Beetle

News

June 24, 2017
A tale of Amaryllis

A Story for Independent Bookshop Week…

Once upon a time, there was a little girl called… let’s just call her A. She had hair as black as a raven’s wing, eyes as green as fresh grass and lips as red as wild strawberries. In fact, she hasn’t really changed at all. Anyway she usually ran wild and free accompanied by her beloved wolfhound but one day her father took her on a trip to the nearby Spa Town, home to gentrification, blue rinses and regency terraces. The house to which they headed was indistinguishable from its neighbours on the outside but as she passed through the front door she entered a world of enchantment. A narrow hallway, with a not unpleasant musty dusty smell, was lined from floor to ceiling with books of every size, shape and hue. As she progressed further into the depths, the house opened before her like a telescope, rooms completely furnished with books, opening out of each other. Eventually she reached the back room: here surrounded by more and more books was a bar behind which stood a man talking to several people who were lounging on stools in front of the bar and partaking of glasses of some ruby liquid whilst soft music wafted around them. Her father explained to her that it was a second hand bookshop and that the man at the bar was the owner. All she knew was that it was some kind of heaven and she wanted to live there for ever…

She grew up, as you do, married, had children. She still read when she had time but life proved increasingly hard despite her joy in her children. One particularly difficult day, she found herself walking across a nearby common and chanced upon a small bookshop overlooking the green. Entering, she was immediately soothed by the familiar bookish smell and the mellow atmosphere. Then, serendipity or a fairy godmother lent a hand! A notice caught her eye advertising a vacancy for a Saturday girl! She applied and was successful and started the next week. She discovered something she was good at: she could talk about books and all her shyness and self-doubt fell away. She discovered empathetic novelists such as Elizabeth Taylor and Barbara Pym: she was happy and life improved.

Her confidence grew so that she felt she was ready to venture out into the wider world. She felt so confident that she thought she would work at the giant bookshop in the very centre of the big town. But she quickly realised that big was not at all better… She had exchanged intimacy for anonymity: she had to wear an ugly black t-shirt; she was constantly subject to rotas and bells and plans and directives that ensured that every shop in the country looked exactly like the other; she spent days shifting toppling towers of books from one table to the next. She discovered that the higher management were recruited from other big companies such as supermarkets and treated books as they would a tin of soup, more concerned with the packaging, recommending books based on the cover. She learned that it was cooler to stand behind the computer than to shelve and handle the books, that how many loyalty card subscribers you signed up was more important than engaging a customer in the joys of reading the classics. The final straw: she came last in the loyalty card league which was posted on the staffroom wall for all to see…

Humiliated and demoralised, she left! But her fairy godmother had not deserted her. She heard of new independent bookshop due to open in the west of the town. She applied, was called for interview where all she had to do was talk about her favourite books and, after an anxious wait, learned she had been successful. She went on to spend her days immersed in books: choosing, shelving, arranging, recommending, dusting and best of all, talking with other like-minded people over coffee and cake and so she lived happily ever after. Which just goes to show that a prince isn’t necessary to a love story – however if any are passing…

This week, I have been reading for our three book groups next week and it has been such a joy! We are discussing The Shooting Party by Isabel Colegate for Classics, Strangers on a Train by Patricia Highsmith for Crime and Amongst Women by John McGahern for a very special birthday general book group.

June 18, 2017
Independent Bookshop Week – Bookshop Party

June 10, 2017
Amaryllis on Hubris

We are now officially the laughing stock of Europe… a high price to pay for the bookshop now being in a Labour constituency for the first time in its life.

Politicians! When will they ever learn? Perhaps if they studied a bit of Greek history, surely on the Eton/grammar school syllabus, they might have learned of the term ‘hubris’, ‘the pride that blinds’…

Or actually, Teresa May could just have learned a lesson from her predecessor. David Cameron called for a referendum on the EU and then sat back dreaming of his name in the history books as the man brave enough to let the people decide etc. But, unfortunately the people had a mind of their own and he will now be in the history books as the man who unnecessarily, and for his own aggrandisement, gave rise to Brexit – and then made a swift exit leaving others to clean up his mess. He now spends most of his time having pedicures!

Teresa May succeeds as Prime Minister: has her own ego trip – a bigger majority to push through her ‘hard’ Brexit; calls a general election despite saying she wouldn’t and has woken up today to the even worse mess of a hung parliament. She now faces a humiliating alliance with the DUP to make any kind of headway, calls from all sides including her own for her resignation and disbelief at her incompetency from the very European powers she will be hoping to impress.

Chaos on a massive scale but she didn’t need to just look to the Greeks to be warned: The King James Version says ‘Pride goeth before destruction and a haughty spirit before a fall’ – and she a vicar’s daughter… Many politicians cite Trollope as a favourite author and Augustus Melmotte in Trollope’s The Way We Live Now, is typical of a the powerful man whose pride and arrogance prove his undoing as a tiny slip leads to exposure and suicide.

In Middlemarch, Mr Bulstrode, a wealthy banker with a suspect past employs religious hypocrisy to build himself into somebody he is not. He is exposed and exiled from the community and only his loving wife stands by him.

In Frankenstein, Victor’s pride in his scientific experiments creates the monster that destroys him – especially relevant to TM and DC in regard to the monster, Brexit.

In comparison with the past bleak months, the election actually feels like a party in the park! I have been considering how to find solace in times of such bleak uncertainty and distress. The television is hopeless, endless channels with absolutely nothing to watch – how is that possible? After a great spell at the pictures: Lady Macbeth; Their Finest; The Handmaiden and Frantz, the silly, super-whatever season has begun.

So, inevitably, I turn to books; but difficult times require a certain type of book: the story needs to confirm humanity without trivialising it. Anything by Barbara Pym, apart from Quartet in Autumn (too melancholy), springs to mind and so I have chosen Jane and Prudence for one of my next book groups. I read Standard Deviation by Katherine Heiny this week which worked wonderfully well on the train journey as the weather added its bit to the general bleakness. As an antidote to the awfulness that is Trump and is withdrawal from the Paris agreement, I would choose Auntie Mame by Patrick Dennis and just wish she were around to deal with him. Other palliatives would be Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles, Another Marvellous Thing by Laurie Colwin, Something Fresh by P G Wodehouse and pretty much everything from the 19th century.

May 21, 2017
Amaryllis on the Silver Screen

It was book group this morning and we were discussing Patrick Hamilton’s searing novel of London just before the outbreak of war, Hangover Square: a sad, lonely schizophrenia sufferer and his mad obsession with Netta, the beautiful but cruelly indifferent object of his desire. It is a novel that positively reeks of cigarette smoke and alcohol as the protagonists puff and imbibe at a really astonishing rate but the unfortunate fact that the author was thoroughly familiar with his subject and themes gives the book great realism and poignancy.

However, the film makers had different ideas… they decided they wanted to make a film of Hangover Square but that the setting should be moved from the working class pubs to upper class drawing rooms and that the sad, shambling, lonely man should become a brutal, murdering psychotic and ne’er a drink was seen to be drunk let alone a hangover to be suffered… Americans seem particularly prone to eliminating the more disturbing aspects such as the death of Roger in Northern Lights – it just didn’t happen in the film. Why don’t they just write their own film rather than ruin an extremely good book? Needless to say and thankfully it was a flop so they didn’t bother with the rest of the trilogy and we were saved any more creative happy endings.

It set me to thinking about books being turned into films. Today, unfortunately, I feel a lot of books are written in the hope that a film (and lots of money) will be the result – these are not good books and should not be encouraged by making them into films, eg anything with the word ‘girl’ in it. Sometimes the film improves on the book but generally the best films are made from very good books. I have just been to see The Handmaiden which is transposed from Victorian London to 1930s Korea and it worked gloriously well – it kept the pace and the tension and the twists and the turns but clothed it in the beauty of the Japanese landscape and sensuous 1930s silks and satins.

In fact, most of the films I have seen recently have been adapted from books – Lady Macbeth, Their Finest, Nocturnal Animals– and I have really enjoyed them. I do think new books work better than classics that require longer and weightier treatment of a television series or radio dramatization although I did love the film versions of Dangerous Liaisons and The Age of Innocence. And they should never star Keira Knightley or Nicole Kidman or children… Unfortunately, some of my favourite children’s books have been ruined by wooden, precocious children such as the Narnia books – dreadful both on film and television. Others have fared much better: A Little Princess, The Secret Garden but a general rule should be that very few children can act – the marvellous Margaret O’Brien being a historic exception; as Beth in Little Women, she could melt the hardest heart.

Film is my other great love apart from books. As a child, I wasn’t allowed to watch television in the day time, but such a forbidden treasure was only the more tempting and, my father away, my mother would eventually give in rather than have me under her busy feet all day. So began my lifelong love affair with black and white melodrama and the Hollywood legends: Bette Davis, Joan Crawford, Cary Grant, Veronica Lake, Robert Mitchum, Lana Turner, Katherine Hepburn – too many to mention but all adored. It was everything about that golden age: the clothes; the hairstyles; the intrigues and love affairs where lighting a cigarette and a smouldering glance spoke passion louder than words or action; the chiaroscuro that played over it all so hauntingly and transported me far away from school, homework, real life… I didn’t even mind that the 1939 film of Wuthering Heights only told half the story or that Greer Garson and her sisters wore crinolines rather than regency gowns in the 1940s Pride and Prejudice: I was in thrall to it all and remain so still.

We had a very interesting book group discussing Outline by Rachel Cusk: whilst not everyone enjoyed the read, it was agreed that she was an extraordinarily good writer and she gave us a lot to think about and discuss and we may even read another of her novels, Transit, which would be a book group first!

I also very much enjoyed my first non-fiction book group – with myself! Yes, sadly no interest as yet, but The Violet Hour was a really interesting read – it details how several literary figures confronted their death. It sounds depressing and morbid and no-one is more scared of the thought of a world without me than me, but it actually wasn’t and I only had the one panic attack!

May 5, 2017
Amaryllis: What the Dickens?

When I was a small girl, there used to be on television a short children’s programme called Hector’s House. This was in the days before children had their own programme channel, their own television in their own rooms. Hector’s House was the last children’s programme of the day and was shown just before the early evening news. This meant that a parent, usually the father, (these were still the dark ages, the mother would be doing her duty in the kitchen), would end up watching this particular programme with the child as he waited for the news – it was good quality time and although I don’t remember my father being particularly taken with Hector’s House (Hector was, in a very modern way, rather at the mercy of his wife ZsaZsa and the busybody frog, Kiki), I do remember that he was a great fan of The Magic Roundabout…

Anyway the thing about Hector was that he was not the most intelligent of dogs and after the cat and frog had run rings around him, he ended the programme with a catchphrase that usually ran along the lines of ‘what a big silly Hector I am’ and everyone loved him and forgave him his faults. I was reminded of this when reading about Diane Abbott’s disastrous interview regarding Labour’s proposal to recruit 25,000 new police officers: when asked about the cost of such a proposal she lost the plot and the figures completely and will neither be allowed to forget nor be forgiven for such a disastrous handling of the situation. I can’t help feeling that if she had just shown a bit of humour and humility in the interview, she might have got off with less approbation. After all we are all human and fallibility is part of the human condition and he who throws the first stone etc etc.

But she didn’t, and politicians generally don’t. They will never admit fault and very rarely apologise for their mistakes as the unfulfilled pledges and promises of Brexit have shown. And their most unappealing characteristic is their hypocrisy! This led me to think of Dickens who has such a colourful array of villains of all sorts and sizes. There are the villains such as Quilp who positively revel in their wickedness and don’t pretend to be other than they are. There are historical reports of people sobbing in the street as the death of Little Nell was finally revealed but I am sure not a few privately admired such dedication in removing such a tediously pious young person and only regretted it took so long…

Then there are brutish fiends such as Mr and Mrs Squeers and Bill Sykes and their opposite, the cold and calculating Mr Tulkinghorn and Ralph Nickleby who prefer to keep their hands clean and let others do their dirty work.

But I think the ones whose downfalls I anticipate with most relish are the hypocrites: Mr Pecksniff, Thomas Gradgrind, Uriah Heep who simper and preach about justice and humility and are so convincing they end up convincing themselves. This appears to be the school to which most of our politicians ascribe… how to deliver sermons on what is best for the many whilst delivering for only the few. Only this time the irony is that they walked away and our downfall is Brexit.

My book of the week is The Sport of Kings: you may need a magnifying glass to actually read the tiny print or ruin your eyes as I have probably done but it is worth it and leaves a lot to ponder. I have also just read the new Elizabeth Strout, Anything is Possible, which is another beautifully quiet and tender novel.

Our new display is ‘Wicked Women’ featuring Lady Macbeth of Mtensk – the film is very good too!

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