Events

Our forthcoming events are listed below. We would love to see you here, but seating is very limited so please book early to avoid disappointment.
To book, please visit our online shop

You can also call or email the bookshop on 020 7229 1010, bookshop@lutyensrubinstein.co.uk to reserve your tickets.

Join our mailing list to be the first to hear about new events.

FORTHCOMING EVENTS

Monday 4th September, 7pm (£10)
I AM, I AM, I AM: MAGGIE O’FARRELL in Conversation with PHILIPPE SANDS
More Information and Booking

Tuesday 12th September, 7pm (£10)
EVERY THIRD THOUGHT: ROBERT McCRUM in Conversation with ADAM PHILLIPS
More Information and Booking

FORTHCOMING BOOK CLUBS

Saturdays at 10.30am – STORYTIME
Half an hour of reading for the under-five set, just turn up! Storytime will be on holiday until September 9th, see you then.

Thursday 27th July, 1pm – CRIME CLUB: THE BLUE ROOM
To join this book club, please email claire@lutyensrubinstein.co.uk

Monday 7th August, 11.30am – DAYLIGHT BOOK CLUB: SO MANY WAYS TO BEGIN
To join this book club, please email claire@lutyensrubinstein.co.uk

Friday 11th August, 11.15am – DAYLIGHT BOOK CLUB: THEY KNEW MR KNIGHT
To join this book club, please email claire@lutyensrubinstein.co.uk

Wednesday 16th August, 10.15am – JUKE BOOKS
To join this book club, please email bookshop@lutyensrubinstein.co.uk

Wednesday 16th August, 12.30pm – LUNCHTIME CLASSICS BOOK CLUB: THE MILL ON THE FLOSS: PART TWO
To join this book club, please email claire@lutyensrubinstein.co.uk

Monday 4th September, 12.45pm – CHILDREN’S LITERATURE FOR GROWN-UPS: HOW I LIVE NOW
To join this book club, please email tara@lutyensrubinstein.co.uk

Thursday 7th September, 12.30pm – CRIME CLUB: THE DROWNING POOL
To join this book club, please email tara@lutyensrubinstein.co.uk

PREVIOUS EVENTS

Tuesday 1st August
SWEETPEA SLIGHT was in Conversation with FIONA SHAW

Wednesday 28th June
BELLA POLLEN and JULIA SAMUEL were in Conversation

Wednesday 21st June
ADAM PHILLIPS discussed IN WRITING

Tuesday 16th May
JENNY LANDRETH on SWELL

Tuesday 25th April 2017
JOANNA MOORHEAD on THE SURREAL LIFE OF LEONORA CARRINGTON

Thursday 6th April 2017
JEAN HANFF KORELITZ and PAUL MULDOON

Tuesday 21st February 2017
AMOR TOWLES discussed A GENTLEMAN IN MOSCOW

Saturday 26th November 2016
POPPY CHANCELLOR: Cut it Out, a Christmas Papercutting workshop

Tuesday 22nd November 2016
ARTEMIS COOPER discussed ELIZABETH JANE HOWARD with SELINA HASTINGS

Tuesday 25th October 2016
RORY STEWART discussed The Marches

Tuesday 4th October 2016
BEN MACINTYRE discussed SAS: Rogue Heroes

Tuesday 20th September
TED SANDLING discussed London In Fragments

Tuesday 28th June
HISHAM MATAR discussed The Return with WILLIAM FIENNES

Tuesday 21st June
ANITA BROOKNER: A panel discussion
Chaired by Juliet Annan, with Carmen Callil, Rachel Cooke and Tessa Hadley

Thursday 9th June 2016
EMMA CLINE discussed The Girls with Alexandra Heminsley

Tuesday 24th May 2016
PHILIPPE SANDS discussed East West Street with KATE FIGES

Tuesday 17th May 2016
JOHN PRESTON discussed A Very English Scandal with ROLAND PHILLIPS

Tuesday 19th April 2016
LISA OWENS & ANNA RAVERAT in Conversation with FRANCESCA MAIN

Tuesday 16th February 2016
ELIZABETH STROUT discussed My Name is Lucy Barton with CRESSIDA CONNOLLY

Tuesday 8th December 2015
ADAM PHILLIPS discussed Unforbidden Pleasures

Wednesday 28th October 2015
GARTH RISK HALLBERG discussed City on Fire with Tom Sutcliffe

Wednesday 30th September2015
Grief… and Happiness: MAX PORTER and JACK UNDERWOOD were in Conversation

Tuesday 29th September 2015
SEBASTIAN FAULKS discussed Where My Heart Used to Beat

Wednesday 9th September 2015
An Evening of Debut Novelists with: COLIN MACINTYRE, LAURA BARNETT, ANTONIA HONEYWELL & CATRIONA WARD

Wednesday 2nd September 2015
BILL CLEGG was in Conversation with ROLAND PHILIPPS

Tuesday 1st September 2015
ELENA FERRANTE: A PANEL DISCUSSION
With CATHY RENTZENBRINK, JONATHAN GIBBS, SUSANNA GROSS and TESSA HADLEY

Thursday 13th August 2015
DAVID GATES and STUART EVERS were in Conversation

Tuesday 14th July 2015
HARPER LEE: A PANEL DISCUSSION
with HADLEY FREEMAN, PHILIPPE SANDS, LOUISA YOUNG & ISABEL ADOMAKOH YOUNG

Tuesday 23rd June 2015
WOMEN IN CLOTHES
Conversation & Clothes Swap with LEANNE SHAPTON

Tuesday 16th June 2015
JAMES WOOD discussed The Nearest Thing to Life

Tuesday 2nd June 2015
HADLEY FREEMAN discussed Life Moves Pretty Fast: The Lessons We Learned from Eighties Movies.

Wednesday 27th May 2015
GERBRAND BAKKER & PER PETTERSON were in Conversation

Tuesday 19th May 2015
Doctors Dissected
MARTIN SCURR & JANE HAYNES were in Conversation

Tuesday 12th May 2015
Germany & Britain
GILES WATERFIELD and NEIL MACGREGOR were in Conversation with GINA THOMAS

Tuesday 5th May 2015
On The Wilder Shores of Love
GEORGIA DE CHAMBERET discussed the life and works of Lesley Blanch with ELISA SEGRAVE

Wednesday 29th April 2015
Love, Sex & Other Foreign Policy Goals
JESSE ARMSTRONG in Conversation with NED BEAUMAN

Tuesday 21st April 2015
Who Governs Britain & Get it Together
ANTHONY KING and ZOE WILLIAMS in Conversation

Tuesday, 3rd March 2015
ALEXANDRA FULLER discussed Leaving Before the Rains Come

Thursday 26th February 2015
DANA THOMAS discussed Gods & Kings: The Rise and Fall of Alexander McQueen and John Galliano

Tuesday 25th November 2014
WILL SELF and IAIN SINCLAIR discussed JG Ballard

Tuesday 28th October 2014
EMMANUEL CARRERE discussed Limonov with ROBERT MCCRUM

Wednesday 15th October 2014
TIMOTHY DONNELLY was in conversation with ADAM PHILLIPS

Tuesday 1st July
ADAM PHILLIPS on Becoming Freud

Thursday 29th May 2014
JOANNA RAKOFF discussed My Salinger Year with RACHEL COOKE

Wednesday 28th May 2014
KATHRYN SIMMONDS in conversation with ADAM PHILLIPS

Wednesday 21st May 2014
KARL OVE KNAUSGAARD in conversation with STEPHEN GROSZ

Tuesday 13th May 2014
PATRICK NESS discussed More than This with VIV GROSKOP

Tuesday 6th May 2014
NED BEAUMAN and ZOE PILGER were in CONVERSATION

Thursday 24th April 2014
ALICE GREENWAY and REBECCA HUNT were in conversation

Tuesday 25th March 2014, 7pm (£8)
BEN MACINTYRE on A Spy Among Friends: Kim Philby and the Great Betrayal

Tuesday 18th March 2014
REBECCA MEAD was in conversation with FERNANDA EBERSTADT on The Road to Middlemarch

Tuesday 4th March 2014
BEN WATT was in conversation with JOHN NIVEN

Thursday 6th February 2014
JAMES LASDUN was in conversation with ADAM PHILLIPS

Monday 2nd December 2013
Nina Stibbe was in conversation with Nick Hornby

Wednesday 27th November 2013
Adam Phillips was in Conversation with Lisa Appignanesi

Wednesday 30th October 2013
Emily Berry was in conversation with Adam Phillips

Thursday 5th September 2013
THE RUM READINGS

Wednesday 28th August 2013, 7pm
SUNDAY NIGHT MOVIES
Leanne Shapton in conversation with Craig Taylor

Thursday 15th August 2013
The Interestings and Clever Girl
Meg Wolitzer and Tessa Hadley in conversation.

Tuesday 16th July 2013
Philipp Meyer discussed The Son with Chris Cleave

Thursday 11th July 2013
Holland House
A Talk by Linda Kelly

Tuesday 2nd July 2013
The Woman Upstairs
Claire Messud talked to Kate Figes

Monday 1st July 2013
Ruth Ozeki and Matt Haig were in conversation with Jamie Byng

Thursday, 6th June 2013
Curtis Sittenfeld Discussed Sisterland with Viv Groskop

Wednesday 1st May 2013
Ron Rash discussed Nothing Gold Can Stay

Tuesday April 30th 2013
William Sutcliffe and John McCarthy were in conversation with William Sieghart

Wednesday 27th March 2013
Oli Hazzard was in conversation with Adam Phillips

Wednesday 13th February 2013
Stephen Grosz and Andrew Solomon were in conversation with Cressida Connolly

Wednesday, 6th February 2013
Lucy Hughes-Hallett discussed The Pike

Monday, 21st January 2013
Don Paterson was in conversation with Adam Phillips

Wednesday, November 28th 2012
Connie Bensley was in conversation with Adam Phillips

Wednesday, September 12th 2012
Jane Draycott was in conversation with Adam Phillips

Monday, September 10th 2012
Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi discussed Jerusalem with Giles Fraser

Wednesday, August 1st 2012
Leanne Shapton discussed Swimming Studies with Craig Taylor

Tuesday, July 3rd 2012
Ned Beauman and Nick Harkaway discussed The Teleportation Accident and Angelmaker with Roland Philipps

Thursday, 21st June 2012
Kate Summerscale discussed Mrs Robinson’s Disgrace with India Knight

Tuesday, 12th June 2012
Adam Phillips discussed Missing Out with Giles Fraser

Monday, 28th May 2012
Chad Harbach on The Art of Fielding

Monday, 23rd April 2012
Ben Macintyre discussed Double Cross

Thursday, 19th April 2012
Peter Stamm discussed Seven Years with Adam Thirlwell

Wednesday, 21st March 2012
Philip Gross was in conversation with Adam Phillips

Wednesday, 14th March 2012
Sadakat Kadri was in conversation with Barnaby Rogerson

Wednesday, 22nd February 2012
John Fuller was in conversation with Adam Phillips

Thursday, 9th February 2012
Lavinia Greenlaw was in conversation with Ted Hodgkinson of Granta Magazine

Tuesday, 31st January 2012
Laura Del-Rivo and Michael Horovitz were in Conversation with Julian Mash

Tuesday, 22nd November 2011
Cressida Connolly and Vendela Vida were in Conversation

Thursday, 17th November 2011
Adam O’ Riordan was in Conversation with Adam Phillips

Wednesday, 28th September 2011
Bernard O’Donoghue was in Conversation with Adam Phillips

Thursday, 23rd June 2011
Hisham Matar was in Conversation with Philippe Sands

Tuesday, 31st May 2011
Evelyn Juers discussed The House of Exile

Wednesday, 25th May 2011
John Burnside was in conversation with Adam Phillips

Monday, 23rd May 2011
Nicola Shulman discussed Graven With Diamonds with Alan Jenkins

Thursday, 19th May 2011
Wilson Stephens Jones Decorative Arts Sale

Wednesday, 11th May 2011
David Miller and David Flusfeder discussed Today and A Film By Spencer Ludwig

Wednesday, 20th April 2011
Christopher Reid was in conversation with Adam Phillips

Sunday, 10th April 2011
James Frey discussed The Final Testament of the Holy Bible with Kate Muir

Sunday, 23rd March 2011
Jennifer Egan discussed A Visit From the Goon Squad

Thursday, 17th March 2011
Jesse Norman discussed The Big Society with Anthony Fry

Wednesday, 16th March 2011
Jo Shapcott was in conversation with Adam Phillips

Wednesday, 26th January 2011
Emma Forrest discussed Your Voice in My Head with Jon Ronson

Wednesday, 24th November 2010
Geoff Dyer discussed Working The Room

Wednesday, 17th November 2010
Adam Phillips discussed On Balance

Wednesday, 3rd November 2010
Justine Picardie discussed Coco Chanel: A Life

Wednesday, 15th September 2010
Rebecca Hunt and Ned Beauman discussed Mr Chartwell and Boxer Beetle

News

July 24, 2017
Amaryllis is Away

This will be my last dispatch as the summer holidays beckon and whilst many of you will be off to The Country or another country, I will be heading for the Highlands: by day scaling the misty mountains, striding through the bracken and running with the deer; by night, lying under the stars or dazzling with my dancing…

We have just read Anne of Green Gables for T’s new adults reading children’s fiction. I was rather apprehensive at reading it so many years later as it was immortalised as one of my favourite books of childhood. But I need not have worried; it was as glorious as ever, funnier and a more melancholy interest in the middle-aged Marilla. Anyway, it probably explains my flights of fantasy. Certainly a trip to the Highlands sounds more exciting than a homecation… Lovely as it is where I live, there are obvious drawbacks to holidaying in the place one lives: cupboards displaying admonitory dust and unused and unusable objects that one now has time to clear out but absolutely no inclination – it’s meant to be a holiday!; cracks and peeling paint become alarmingly visible once one has time to pay attention; picking up all those books I have promised myself when I have time whilst guiltily trying to ignore the pile of proofs falling off the shelf… There is no place like home unless you are coming home from a villa in Verona or a cottage in Cornwall. But it is what it is and could be a lot worse and with sun, sea, sky and seagulls imagination can take you anywhere… (Strange that all the good things start with s or c – chocolate, coffee, cigarettes and cats).

I don’t know why people are so shocked at the disclosure that women in the BBC earn a great deal less than the men. From what I hear from my female friends, with a few notable exceptions, it is the same everywhere and as Jess Crispin explains in her book, Why I am Not a Feminist, nothing much has changed even when women are in charge. When I had to go to work at another Wsyrtdypmrd after my previous store closed, I was classed as two paygrades lower than my mostly male counterparts despite the fact that I had worked for the company for much longer, had more experience and knowledge and had even helped to train some of these now co-workers! Working part-time as many women are forced to do when they have children did and does not help the cause; shorter hours mistakenly taken to mean less work and rushing home to deal with fractious children taken as a snub to the outer office camaraderie and social politics.

I did promise to add to my summer reading list so here goes:

A Spot of Bother, Mark Haddon – not a new one just new to me and I really enjoyed it. It is actually a funny book which is quite unusual in itself as a recently retired man has a mid-life crisis.

The Party, Elizabeth Day – this is actually a hardback (sorry) but a very slim one and it is a very good holiday read as simmering affections and resentments come to a head at – a party!

Collected Stories
, Somerset Maugham – which I am actually listening to on Radio 4 extra but have read before and they are a wonderful stories about long ago times and places.

Heat Wave, Penelope Lively – actually I would re-read any Penelope Lively but this has all the drama of a hot summer to recommend it.

July 19, 2017
Notes from a Teenager

We were lucky enough to have a Work Experience Lad for a couple of days this week, who cheerfully performed a number of tasks that were vastly beneath his intellect. We asked him to write his list of Summer reading for this site, expecting maybe The Hardy Boys or George MacDonald Fraser, and were very pleasantly surprised by his recommendations. No doubt he’ll be replacing A and T just as soon as he finishes his A-levels….

[Louis writes:]
Zero K is the most recent novel from one of the greatest contemporary novelists, Don Delillo, in which the plot is stripped entirely down to a series of fragmented meditations on mortality and technology. This book is not for everyone, and those seeking an easy read for relaxing with on the beach should read no further, but for those willing to surrender themselves to a style as bleak and labyrinthine as the bare underground corridors in which much of the novel takes place, Zero K will be a rewarding, if challenging read. A good entry into Delillo for those intimidated by his behemothic masterpiece Underworld.

The Vegetarian may not seem like the ideal summer read – an uncompromisingly dark and violent exploration of human cruelty, insanity and shame. Yet this Man Booker International-prize winning novella by Korean author Han Kang ought to be read by everyone, regardless of season, and a pleasant poolside environment may provide a welcome antidote to the quiet brutality and violent beauty of this devastatingly powerful book. The plot is indescribable – just read it.

Kafka on the Shore
is the tenth novel by acclaimed Japanese novelist Haruki Murakami, and showcases his intriguing and often humorous juxtaposition of magical realism and a contemporary setting strewn with references to popular culture, all described beautifully in intricate, even mundane detail. The fragmented plot follows the twin journeys of a 15-year-old runaway and an old man with the ability to communicate with cats – fans of Salman Rushdie will no doubt be entertained, as will those seeking relief from the less-than-uplifting previous entries on this list.

The Master and Margherita could be considered a literary ancestor The Satanic Verses, skilfully blending the supernatural, the religious and the unmistakably real as it recounts the anarchic exploits of Satan and his entourage in 1960s Moscow. Leaping wildly between locations, characters and even millennia to tell the story of the mischievous demons and those unfortunate enough to encounter them, Mikhail Bulgakov’s masterpiece manages to function both as a uproariously funny piece of entertainment and a biting satire of soviet society. You’re unlikely to find a gun-wielding cat in any other book you read this summer.

Tender is the Night is the fifth entry on the list – finally, a sort-of summery book. F. Scott Fitzgerald’s final completed novel begins on the French Riviera and from there follows glamorous couple Dick and Nicole Diver, revealing piece-by-piece the secret that ultimately destroys them. Entertaining and engaging without deviating from the deep personal tragedy at its heart, this semi-autobiographic novel is Fitzgerald’s overlooked masterpiece. I re-read it every summer and it gets better each time.

July 8, 2017
Amaryllis on Centre Court

I have always loved Wimbledon fortnight: tennis is actually the only sport that I can bear to watch; I think because, at its best, it is like dance; elegance and fluidity masking extreme athleticism and hard work.

However, I have to admit that there are things about the whole televised bit that really annoy me… First of all, Britmania! the obsession with British players so that, until they are hopefully and thankfully knocked out in the first few days, we have to suffer boring matches on every channel whilst fully aware that elsewhere some brilliant, edge of your seat match is going on that we, (well, I because I don’t have iplayer and anyway they shouldn’t assume that everyone does) will never see. And if we’re not watching these matches, we are forced to sit through endless discussions with every unlucky commentator about every shot played. I’m not really into patriotic fervour regarding sport, and tennis especially is much more about individual performances. And, before anyone mentions it, I do switch off my television and go and do something else instead but I would prefer to be watching actual, superb tennis in this very short two weeks.

Even worse though are the lingering shots of the ‘Royal’ box. The metro this morning featured a sickening image of George Osborne stuffing himself with Carole Middleton’s bucket of sweets. Why is he there? And Pippa Middleton and so many others… I can see the appearance of royalty gives a bit of occasion to the finals and understand why the player’s family and other sports people should have a seat but just because someone is rich and famous or, as in the above, infamous, seems entirely wrong and reinforces its elitist image. Too many seats are given up for corporate occasions and then left empty as they sup champagne away from the court. I would rather see the box full of enthusiastic school children who would really enjoy the treat and who also might be inspired to be players worth talking about in the future.

Anyway, Wimbledon signifies summer and so I thought I would suggest a few titles for all those embarking on their holidays. A lot of the papers seem to suggest hard-backs which seems pretty unhelpful unless you have a Bunter, Jeeves or Alfred accompanying you…

So here are my suggestions, all paperback:

Pachinko by Min Jin Lee – for those who want an engrossing, longer read, this book follows memorable characters from South Korea to Japan during the 20th century. It is a period and region I realise I knew little about and Lee is a wonderful storyteller.

Eligible by Curtis Sittenfeld – my colleagues will probably be very surprised that I am suggesting this as they now I usually avoid retellings of classics like the plague… But actually I thought this was rather a clever and funny reimagining of Pride and Prejudice, more like the Clueless version of Emma. I read it lying on a beach and I think it is perfect as just that.

The Hours Before Dawn by Celia Fremlin – a lost psychological, crime classic reminiscent of Patricia Highsmith but set in the claustrophobic world of 1950s British gentility.

Broken and Burned by Mark Hardie – a crime novelist new to me and this is his first book. A police duo tackle the murkier side of life in Southend and the surrounding area but sometimes it is hard to distinguish who are the bad guys…

Jane and Prudence by Barbara Pym – I am re-reading this for our book group on Monday and am reminded what an utter delight it is and just perfect for summer.

June 30, 2017
Independent Bookshop Week: Mark Billingham and Sebastian Faulks recommend….

On Saturday June 24th, top authors, customers and bookshop staff united to celebrate the start of Independent Bookshop Week. It was a joyous occasion, filled with music, book chat and stuffed blue kangaroos, in honour of Emma Chichester Clarke’s visit. 

If you are stuck for summer reading ideas you need look no further, as bestselling authors Mark Billingham and Sebastian Faulks shared their top recommendations for books they have recently enjoyed: 

Mark’s picks: 

Slow Horses, by Mick Herron
Missing Presumed, by Susie Steiner
Uncommon People, by David Hepworth

Sebastian’s picks:

The Day that Went Missing, by Richard Beard
The Black Prince, by Iris Murdoch
The Voyage of Dr Doolittle, by Hugo Lofting

Thanks to all who made L&R’s Independent Bookshop Week party a success – we hope you enjoyed it as much as we did! 

June 24, 2017
A tale of Amaryllis

A Story for Independent Bookshop Week…

Once upon a time, there was a little girl called… let’s just call her A. She had hair as black as a raven’s wing, eyes as green as fresh grass and lips as red as wild strawberries. In fact, she hasn’t really changed at all. Anyway she usually ran wild and free accompanied by her beloved wolfhound but one day her father took her on a trip to the nearby Spa Town, home to gentrification, blue rinses and regency terraces. The house to which they headed was indistinguishable from its neighbours on the outside but as she passed through the front door she entered a world of enchantment. A narrow hallway, with a not unpleasant musty dusty smell, was lined from floor to ceiling with books of every size, shape and hue. As she progressed further into the depths, the house opened before her like a telescope, rooms completely furnished with books, opening out of each other. Eventually she reached the back room: here surrounded by more and more books was a bar behind which stood a man talking to several people who were lounging on stools in front of the bar and partaking of glasses of some ruby liquid whilst soft music wafted around them. Her father explained to her that it was a second hand bookshop and that the man at the bar was the owner. All she knew was that it was some kind of heaven and she wanted to live there for ever…

She grew up, as you do, married, had children. She still read when she had time but life proved increasingly hard despite her joy in her children. One particularly difficult day, she found herself walking across a nearby common and chanced upon a small bookshop overlooking the green. Entering, she was immediately soothed by the familiar bookish smell and the mellow atmosphere. Then, serendipity or a fairy godmother lent a hand! A notice caught her eye advertising a vacancy for a Saturday girl! She applied and was successful and started the next week. She discovered something she was good at: she could talk about books and all her shyness and self-doubt fell away. She discovered empathetic novelists such as Elizabeth Taylor and Barbara Pym: she was happy and life improved.

Her confidence grew so that she felt she was ready to venture out into the wider world. She felt so confident that she thought she would work at the giant bookshop in the very centre of the big town. But she quickly realised that big was not at all better… She had exchanged intimacy for anonymity: she had to wear an ugly black t-shirt; she was constantly subject to rotas and bells and plans and directives that ensured that every shop in the country looked exactly like the other; she spent days shifting toppling towers of books from one table to the next. She discovered that the higher management were recruited from other big companies such as supermarkets and treated books as they would a tin of soup, more concerned with the packaging, recommending books based on the cover. She learned that it was cooler to stand behind the computer than to shelve and handle the books, that how many loyalty card subscribers you signed up was more important than engaging a customer in the joys of reading the classics. The final straw: she came last in the loyalty card league which was posted on the staffroom wall for all to see…

Humiliated and demoralised, she left! But her fairy godmother had not deserted her. She heard of new independent bookshop due to open in the west of the town. She applied, was called for interview where all she had to do was talk about her favourite books and, after an anxious wait, learned she had been successful. She went on to spend her days immersed in books: choosing, shelving, arranging, recommending, dusting and best of all, talking with other like-minded people over coffee and cake and so she lived happily ever after. Which just goes to show that a prince isn’t necessary to a love story – however if any are passing…

This week, I have been reading for our three book groups next week and it has been such a joy! We are discussing The Shooting Party by Isabel Colegate for Classics, Strangers on a Train by Patricia Highsmith for Crime and Amongst Women by John McGahern for a very special birthday general book group.

More news...